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Relation of the Battle of Marengo Relation de la Bataille de Marengo (Relation of the Battle of Marengo) by Général Alex. Berthier. This short history of the battle of Marengo was written by the nominal commander of the French Army of the Reserve, Alexandre Berthier as a tribute to the acknowledged actual commander, Napoleon Bonaparte, then First Consul of the French Republic. It has always been one of the most important primary sources on the battle, in spite of its numerous flaws (not least of which is the author's almost total ignorance of what Austrian units were doing what). The work included four maps, which were clearly prepared with much greater care than is typical for period battlefield maps. An interesting point is to compare the course of the Bormida river on these maps with its course in the much later 1:25,000 maps prepared by the Italian Istituto Geografico Militare. HTML.
Campaign of the Army of the Reserve in 1800 Campagne de L’Armée de Réserve en 1800 (Campaign of the Army of the Reserve in 1800) by Capitaine Gaspar de Cugnac. This two-volume history of the Campaign of the Army of the Reserve is essentially a collection of primary sources. It consists almost entirely of French correspondence, reports and returns, with a modest amount of narrative text written by Cugnac. The first volume covers events up the passage of the St. Bernard Pass, and the second volume covers events from there up to and including the battle of Marengo. The two volumes total about 1300 pages in length, and is by far the most important work for getting information about the French side of the campaign. Its only important limitation is in its almost exclusive focus on the French side – information about the Austrians must come from other sources. HTML.
From Jena to Pr. Eylau Von Jena bis Pr. Eylau (From Jena to Pr. Eylau) by Colmar Freiherr von der Goltz. This work was published in 1907. It's author was a Prussian General of Infantry. Early in his career, the author was attached to the historical section of the Prussian general of Staff, where he wrote several books on Prussian military operations. The current work was a sequel to his book Von Rossbach bis Jena und Auerstadt. The earlier book traced the Prussian army from what Goltz took to be its high point, the Battle of Rossbach, to its humiliation at Jena-Austerstadt. The current volume was intended to take that story forward, to the Battle of Pr. Eylau, which Goltz took to be the moment when it merited (even if it did not at the time receive) the recovery of its honor. Thus, the book's subtitle, Des alten Preußischen Heeres Schmach und Ehrenrettung, which roughly translates to The Disgrace and Redemption of the Old Prussian Army. PDF.
The War of 1806 and 1807 Der Krieg von 1806 und 1807 (The War of 1806 and 1807) by Eduard von Höpfner. This work was published in 1850. Its author was a Prussian Major General (then a Colonel). One of the oddities of the 1806-1807 campaign was that it produced two different four-volume Prussian staff histories of the war, both with the same title. Staff histories were notable for their use of archival sources (by no means the rule in historical writing prior to this) and high degree of operational detail. This is the earlier of the two staff histories of 1806-1807, and is largely (though not entirely) subsumed by the later work by Lettow-Vorbek. Still, it is still not wholly without interest and is routinely cited in modern histories of the conflict. Volumes.
Campaign of the Army of the Reserve in 1800 Bonaparte vor Mantua (Bonaparte Before Mantua) by Viktor Hortig. This work was published in 1903 as the dissertation of Viktor Hortig. It takes as its subject the operations of General Bonaparte against Wurmser’s first advance during the critical week from 28 July 1796 to 6 August 1796, culminating in the battle of Castiglione. The particular focus of the study is on the evolution of Bonaparte’s planning as the campaign developed, and it includes a series of five beautifully done color maps showing the detailed locations of the opposing armies at different points in the campaign. HTML.
Campaign of the Army of the Reserve in 1800 Histoire Régimentaire et Divisionnaire de l'armée d'Italie (History of the Regiments and Divisions of the Army of Italy) compiled by the editors of the Spectateur Militaire. Published in 1844, this is a compilatation of extracts of the regimental histories of the French regiments that cover Napoleon’s 1796-1797 Italian campaign. The histories vary widely in their degrees of detail. Some were clearly taken from journals of the campaign and contain day-by-day logs of where the unit was and what it was doing. Others are very unsystematic, providing great detail about some incidents while remaining completely silent about other matters. For all works, claims about the accomplishments of the units should be taken with a grain of salt (to say the least) and descriptions of enemy strengths and movements are completely unreliable. Used properly, however, the histories are an extremely useful research tool that can fill in many details missing from the accounts of the senior commanders. HTML.
The War of 1806 and 1807 Der Krieg von 1806 und 1807 (The War of 1806 and 1807) by Oscar von Lettow-Vorbeck. This work was published in 1891. Its author was Oscar von Lettow-Vorbeck, then a Colonel in the Prussian army. This is the later of the two four-volume Prussian staff histories of the war, and for modern research purposes, much the more important of the two. The level of operational detail is very high, and it is well-supplied with orders of battle and maps. Unsurprisingly, it is more focused on Prussian operations than either of the other two armies, but it hardly neglects either. It remains a invaluable research source over 100 years after it was written. Volumes.
The War of 1806 and 1807 Bataille de Preussisch-Eylau (The Battle of Preussisch-Eylau) by Napoleon I. This work was published in 1807. Although no author is given on the work itself, authorship is usually credited to Napoleon. Its basic function was propaganda. A Prussian pamphlet about the battle had been published including a rather abstracted map of the battle, showing how the French army had been defeated by arriving Prussian forces. To counter this, and to establish a French (and personal) claim to victory, Napoleon ordered the publication of a pamphlet of his own, centered on battle maps using on a survey of the battlefield Napoleon had ordered, along with some bulletins and an account ostensibly by a German eye-witness to the battle, which is actually thought to have been written by Napoleon himself. PDF.
Italy 1:25,000 Carta Topografica del Regno d'Italia 1:25 000 (Topgraphic Map of the Kingdom of Italy 1:25,000) by the Istituto Geografico Militare (Italy). This is a series of 1:25,000 maps published by the Italian government starting in the last decades of the 19th century. The maps in the series were repeatedly revised and re-published in the decades that followed. The large scale of these maps makes them suitable for battlefield research, although of course care must be taken when used for battles which occured decades before they were made. Typically they are best used in combination with period maps, which lack the topographic information and accurate scales of these maps. The online collection includes maps of the battlefields of Arcola, Caldiero, Bassano, Castiglione, Lonato, Fontaniva, Marengo, and Rivoli. HTML.
Italy 1:200,000 Carta Topografica del Regno d'Italia 1:200 000 (Topgraphic Map of the Kingdom of Italy 1:200,000) by the Istituto Geografico Militare (Italy). This is a series of 1:200,000 maps published by the Italian government starting in the last decades of the 19th century. The maps in the series were repeatedly revised and re-published in the decades that followed. These maps are too small-scale to represent battlefields well, but they are useful for the study of campaigns, although of course care must be taken when used for campaigns which occured decades before they were made. Although period maps must be used with them, there are no period maps comparable to these in terms of detail and comprehensiveness (period maps will typically either be much smaller-scale or cover a much smaller area). Currently only the maps for northern Italy are included here. HTML.
Austria 1:75,000 Karte der osterr.-ungar. Monarche im Masse von 1:75,000 (Map of the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy at the scale of 1:75,000) by the Militargeographisches Institut (Austria-Hungary). This is a series of 1:75,000 maps published by the Austro-Hungarian government starting in the last decades of the 19th century. The maps in the series were repeatedly revised and re-published in the decades that followed. The large scale of these maps makes them suitable for battlefield research, although of course care must be taken when used for battles which occured decades before they were made. Typically they are best used in combination with period maps, which lack the topographic information and accurate scales of these maps. The online collection includes maps of the battlefields of Austerlitz and Aspern-Essling/Wagram. HTML.
Germany 1:25,000 Topographische Karte 1:25,000 (Topographic Maps 1:25,000) by the Heer Generalstab (Germany). This is a series of 1:25,000 maps published by the German General Staff prior to World War II. The large scale of these maps makes them suitable for battlefield research, although of course care must be taken when used for battles which occured over a century before they were made. Typically they are best used in combination with period maps, which lack the topographic information and accurate scales of these maps. The online collection includes maps of the battlefields of Bautzen, Dresden, Preussisch-Eylau, Friedland, Jena-Auerstadt, and Lützen. HTML.